Year:2023   Volume: 4   Issue: 3   Area:

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  3. ID: 87

Osama Rashid Abbas AL-SAFFAR ‎, Qisma Ubaid Hilwas AL-KHAFAJY ‎

THE SECONDARY PHONEME FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF KAMAL BISHR AN APPLIED STUDY IN THE IRAQI VERNACULAR

Secondary phoneme: It is the term that was approved by a number ‎of ‎researchers for the concept of stress.. they called it a ‎‎(secondary ‎phoneme) according to a concept that preceded it and ‎they called it: ‎‎(phoneme). from which the word is composed in any ‎language in the ‎world, so the letter - for example - is a phonetic ‎unit with significance, ‎which contributes with other phonemic ‎units in building the word, and ‎revolves around each phoneme, a ‎possible package of articulatory colors, ‎which has no effect on the ‎meaning, called (phones)...‎ ‎In terms of the functional importance with which the (phoneme) ‎was ‎distinguished; We found another importance in (emphasis), ‎which means ‎in the term: an intentional increase in the amount of ‎utterance that ‎diverts the meaning from its destination. In order to ‎prove and confirm it, ‎or turn it around and deny it, this addition - ‎which may come, excuse me, ‎at no cost, is important. Because it ‎often carries a new connotation that ‎was not present in the ‎original phoneme..‎ In this study, we found that the (colloquial) devoid of the ‎syntactic ‎industry is suitable in terms of application in the ‎phonetic study; ‎Because it leads to accurate results that cannot be ‎obtained in the ‎standard sentence, and Kamal Bishr took ‎advantage of the Egyptian ‎spoken in his applications and examples ‎in his book (Science of ‎Phonetics) without indicating the reason ‎that prompted him to do so, so ‎we expanded on the statement of ‎what he concluded, with applications ‎reproduced from our ‎linguistic reality. The Iraqi, full of spontaneity, the ‎results of ‎‎(spontaneity) - as we can see - are more accurate than the ‎results ‎of the decoration and care that surrounded it (the ‎standard ‎artifact)‎.‎

Keywords: Phoneme, Stress, Kamal Bishr, Intonation, Japanese

http://dx.doi.org/10.47832/2791-9323.‎‏3‏‎-4‎‏.‏‎‏9‏


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